Last edited by Jular
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

1 edition of Monotype Romulus, designed by Jan van Krimpen. found in the catalog.

Monotype Romulus, designed by Jan van Krimpen.

Monotype Romulus, designed by Jan van Krimpen.

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  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsKrimpen, Jan van.
The Physical Object
Pagination[1] p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20628263M

Type designers have been integrating the design of sans serifs with serifed forms since the s. Early examples are Edward Johnston's design for the London Underground, and Eric Gill's Gill were followed by Jan van Krimpen's Romulus Sans, Frederic Goudy's ITC Goudy Sans, Hermann Zapf's Optima, Hans Meier's Syntax and Adrian Frutiger's Frutiger. all-cotton fiber by the Inveresk Mill in England. The type is Romulus, designed by Jan Van Krimpen for the Enschede Foundry in the ’s. The book was available either as unbound sheets, bound in full linen, or in full goatskin (such as the present copy). Also, an edition of

It probably was an inspiration for Jan Van Krimpen. First precedents: Bernhard and Van Krimpen. Probably the earliest idea of conceiving a ‘serial’ type family has been the ambitious Romulus typeface designed by Jan Van Krimpen for the firms Enschedé and Monotype at the beginning of the s. About this Item: The Whittington Press, Herefordshire, Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. First Edition. Stiff card covers in clean, bright condition with a similar bright dust jacket which is very slightly sunned on the spine, accompanying flyers for Matrix 12 and the reprint of Matrix 2, from an edition of

  Jan van Krimpen was a Dutch typographer, book designer and type designer. He worked for the printing house Koninklijke Joh. Enschedé. He also worked with Monotype in England, who issued or reissued many of his designs outside the Netherlands. [44] [lower-alpha 3] A few other type designers replicated his approach for a time: van Krimpen's Romulus and William Addison Dwiggins' Electra were both released with obliques. [lower-alpha 4] Morison's Times New Roman typeface has a very traditional true italic in the style of the late eighteenth century, which he later wryly commented owed.


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Monotype Romulus, designed by Jan van Krimpen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Adventures in the Monotype Archive: Jan van Krimpen’s Angry letters. Welcome back to the Monotype Archive. Thanks to Monotype designer Toshi Omagari, I was able to spend time last week digging through boxes and pawing old documents and type drawings at the site of the former Monotype factory in Salfords.

Jan van Krimpen () Born in Monotype Romulus, van Krimpen was a calligrapher, book designer, and type designer. His typefaces are regarded as restrained, beautiful, and classical. His designs are very influential, though they are not widely used.

His most famous typeface is Lutetia, which is based on his own handwriting. First precedents: Lucien Bernhard and Jan Van Krimpen () Probably the earliest idea of conceiving a ‘serial’ type family has been the ambitious Romulus typeface designed by Jan Van Krimpen for the firms Enschedé and Monotype at the beginning of the s.

For her type revival project at KABK, Barbara Bigosinska picked Lutetia () and writes: Lutetia was designed as a commission from Enschedé by Jan van Krimpen. The drawings of the typeface were ready in the middle of and first cut and cast in 16 point size in the Enschedé Type Foundry.

Lutetia in use. Designed by Jan van Krimpen, cut by P.H. Rädisch and released by Enschedé in in roman and italic. First used in a catalog for the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes in Paris, and hence named after the Roman name of Paris.

A revised version with several modified characters (most notably an ‘e’ now with horizontal bar) was made in. Discussion of this problem has long been going on, for example by Jan van Krimpen. The design of a lead type cannot be copied without some adjustments since the pressure on lead type during printing presses the ink sideways, and the final appearance of the.

The title page display type is taken from the letterpress proofs of Jan van Krimpen's Romulus, designed for the Monotype Company in The main text of Volumes I and II is set in Granjon.

Chapter initials are from an alphabet designed by Gianfrancesco Cresci in for Il perfetto scrittore and based on the lettering from the Column of Trajan. The title page display type is taken from the letterpress proofs of Jan van Krimpen's Romulus, designed for the Monotype Company in The main text of Volumes I and II is set in Granjon.

Chapter initials are from an alphabet designed by Gianfrancesco Cresci in for Il perfetto scrittore and based on the lettering from the Column of Format: Hardcover. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

He appointed a contemporary designer to develop a new book face. This was Eric Gill (–) and the result was Perpetua (). In addition to new typefaces, such as Romulus and Spectrum by Jan van Krimpen, Monotype continued to produce revivals such as.

Romulus was a early 'super family' with roman, cursive, chancery italic, sans serif and Greek in a range of weights. You can read his thoughts on type in his On Designing and Devising Types.

(Recommended Reading and van Krimpen content source: Sjaak Hubregtse:The Aesthetic World of Jan van Krimpen.) Women and The Private Press. In typography, italic type is a cursive font based on a stylised form of calligraphic handwriting.

Owing to the influence from calligraphy, italics normally slant slightly to the s are a way to emphasise key points in a printed text, to identify many types of creative works, to cite foreign words or phrases, or, when quoting a speaker, a way to show which words they stressed.

A Tally of Types is a book on typography authored by the type designer Stanley Morison. It was first published inand showcases significant typeface designs produced during Morison's tenure at the Lanston Monotype Corporation for their hot-metal typesetting machines during the Author: Stanley Morison.

The paper on which it is printed is mouldmade Somerset, manufactured from all-cotton fiber by the Inveresk Mill in England.

The type is Romulus, designed by Jan Van Krimpen for the Enschede Foundry in the ’s. The book was available either as unbound sheets, bound in full linen, or in full goatskin (such as the present copy).

Transitional, or baroque, serif typefaces first became common around the midth century until the start of the nineteenth. They are in between "old style" and "modern" fonts, thus the name "transitional". Differences between thick and thin lines are more pronounced than they are in old style, but less dramatic than they are in the Didone fonts that followed.

The Good Book in Good Hands / At San Francisco's Arion Press, Andrew Hoyem and crew are creating a very fine, very large, very expensive Bible the old-fashioned way -- by hand Johannes Gutenberg's.

The letterpressed text is printed on an Asbern press, employing two faces supplied by M&H Type of San Francisco: foundry Hadriano titling designed by Fredric Goudy inhand-set by Kate Hitt, and Monotype Romulus by Jan Van Krimpen designed incomposition by Peter W.

Stoelzl. Electra is a serif typeface designed by William Addison Dwiggins and published by the Mergenthaler Linotype Company from onwards. A book face intended for body text, Dwiggins described the design as intended to be a 'modern roman type letter' with 'personality', avoiding direct revival of Category: Serif.

Last, largest, and most splendid of the early imperial forums, the Forum of Trajan (A.D. ) was the acknowledged showplace of ancient Rome. Ammianus Marcellinus called the Forum "a construction unique under the heavens, as we believe, and /5.

National Monument on the Dam square (Amsterdam) with inscription designed by Jan van Krimpen. Castellar (Monotype) by John Peters. Univers (Deberny & Peignot) by Adrian Frutiger. Neue Haas Grotesk (Haas) [later Helvetica (Stempel)] by Max Miedinger and Eduard Hoffmann.

Optima (Stempel) by Hermann Zapf. The title page display type is taken from the letterpress proofs of Jan van Krimpen's Romulus, designed for the Monotype Company in The main text of Volumes I and II is set in Granjon.

Chapter initials are from an alphabet designed by Gianfrancesco Cresci in for Il perfetto scrittore and based on the lettering from the Column of : James E. Packer.On Preparing Designs for Monotype Faces so As to Prevent Arbitrary Encroachments from the Side of the Drawing Office on the Designer's Work and Intentions and Oterhwise Inevitable Disappointments At the Designer's End Offprint from Matrix 11 de Krimpen Jan Van y una gran selección de libros, arte y artículos de colección disponible en The title page display type is taken from the letterpress proofs of Jan van Krimpen's Romulus, designed for the Monotype Company in The main text of Volumes I and II is set in Granjon.

Chapter initials are from an alphabet designed by Gianfrancesco Cresci in for Il perfetto scrittore and based on the lettering from the Column of Trajan.